Send Mail with HTML format

by DAVIDT » Sat, 27 Feb 2010 12:50:53 GMT


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 Hi All

Is possible sent email with html format.

                    String[] mailto = { email };
            // Create a new Intent to send messages
            Intent sendIntent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_SEND);
            // Add attributes to the intent
            sendIntent.putExtra(Intent.EXTRA_EMAIL, mailto);
            sendIntent.putExtra(Intent.EXTRA_SUBJECT,subject);
            sendIntent.putExtra(Intent.EXTRA_TEXT,body);

            //sendIntent.setType("text/plain");
            //sendIntent.setType("message/rfc822");
            sendIntent.setType("text/html");

            startActivity(Intent.createChooser(sendIntent, "Send mail ..."));
            finish();

It no sent email in format html . some alternative

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